Recent Blog Posts

When Is a Fired Employee Entitled to Unpaid Commissions in Texas?

Consider this scenario: Employee A has worked in sales for Employer B for many years.  In addition to a small salary, Employee A gets a 4% commission on all sales.  On July 1, Employee A’s employment ends, either because Employee A quits or Employer B fires Employee A.  There are pending commissions from May and… Read More »

Fifth Circuit Finds That a “Fried Chicken” Joke Was Racist

The Fifth Circuit’s decision in Autry v. Fort Bend Independent School District, No. 11-20639 (5th Cir. Jan. 7, 2013), raised eyebrows for reasons that had nothing to do with its ultimate outcome.  The plaintiff (who is black) claimed that he was denied a promotion due to racial discrimination.  The School District acknowledged that it hired a… Read More »

What Are Wage Disputes?

Employers have a legal obligation in every state to pay their employees within a certain period, to pay them minimum wage or above and to pay them for any overtime hours worked. Failing to do so is illegal and employers may be held liable.  If you feel that your employer is mistreating you and violating… Read More »

What are the Most Common Cases of Wrongful Termination?

When an employee is fired illegally or his or her termination is in clear violation of company policy, it is considered a wrongful termination. If you believe you have been unfairly fired, you should contact Houston wrongful termination lawyers to discuss your situation. If indeed a wrongful termination has taken place, you have the right… Read More »

What Are My Rights if My Company Downsizes?

Downsizing, also known as workplace reduction, occurs when an employer enacts a mass termination of its employees in order to reduce costs. Although this typically means employees are terminated permanently, sometimes hours are reduced and tasks rearranged, with the goal of saving the business or making it more effective. While downsizing is well within any… Read More »

When Do You Need an Employment Attorney?

State and federal law grants employees certain rights and protections to ensure they are treated fairly in the workplace. If you believe you have been wrongfully terminated, sexually harassed, discriminated against, or unfairly treated in any way at your job, it is in your best interest to contact Houston employment attorneys for support and guidance…. Read More »

Houston Court of Appeals Extends Drennen to an Suit for Injunctive Relief to Enforce a Non-Compete

On August 29, 2014, the Texas Supreme Court issued its decision in Exxon Corp. v. Drennen, holding that New York law governed the enforceability of a non-compete in the context of the forfeiture of an employee’s stock options.  The Texas Supreme Court held that, when the only penalty is the forfeiture of stock options, the… Read More »

Disability Discrimination Claim Survives Summary Judgment Even Though the Employee Requested an Unreasonable Accommodation

The Americans with Disabilities Act and Chapter 21 of the Texas Labor Code prohibit disability discrimination and require an employer to provide reasonable accommodations to a disabled employee.  If an employee requests a reasonable accommodation, the employer and an employee must engage in an “interactive process” to determine an acceptable accommodation.  All too often, however, employers… Read More »

Fifth Circuit Upholds Religious Discrimination Claim by Fort Bend County Employee

Religious discrimination claims are different from most other types of discrimination claims because, under appropriate circumstances, an employer may have an affirmative obligation to accommodate an employee’s religious practices.  The Fifth Circuit considered this type of religious discrimination claim in Davis v. Fort Bend County, No.13-20610 (5th Cir. Aug. 26, 2014). The plaintiff was an… Read More »

When Is a Non-Compete Not a Non-Compete? The Texas Supreme Court’s Decision in Exxon v. Drennen

On its face, the recent Texas Supreme Court decision in Exxon Corp. v. Drennen, No. 12-0621 (Tex. Aug. 29, 2014), might seem to have limited relevance to Texas law.  The Court held that the case was governed by New York law and decided the case based on New York precedent.  But a closer look at… Read More »